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Create Account to manage your assets on the Jefferson National Account Management website.

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November 16, 2015

ThinkAdvisor: Annuities Are Neither Good Nor Bad - As Long As Clients Come First

 

For years, Jefferson National has followed the polarizing debate around whether variable annuities are a key part of retirement planning—or the worst of all possible investment vehicles.

In response to this ongoing question, ThinkAdvisor published an article written by Jefferson National President Larry Greenberg, entitled “Annuities are neither Good nor Bad—as Long as Clients Come First.”

The topic gained recent steam when ThinkAdvisor published a Q&A with Investment Analyst, Ken Fisher saying that he “hates annuities.” A rebuttal quickly followed, quoting industry experts, including Dr. Wade Pfau and Dr. Moshe Milevsky, saying that annuities can be “a very important retirement tool.”

The editor of ThinkAdvisor asked Mr. Greenberg to “moderate” the debate and explain what this means. He starts off the article posing the question, “Are annuities the good, the bad or the ugly?” To get past the ugly and beyond the question of good versus bad, Mr. Greenberg notes that it hinges on the unique financial profile of the client and their level of risk tolerance. Additionally, he emphasizes that it’s the advisor’s job to help sort through the available products to look for transparency, low cost and client value.

Read the full article published by ThinkAdvisor, here